1.877.763.7444
 
16 DAYS / 15 NIGHTS
Wildlife Safari
  • Expedition India
  • Expedition 2 India
  • Expedition India
  • Expedition 2 India
  • Expedition India

OVERVIEW

There are few places in Asia where such a wide variety of wildlife can be found in such abundance. This is a superb opportunity to combine sightseeing to some of the must-see sights of north India, such as Old Delhi, the Taj Mahal and Khajuraho’s erotic temples, with an in-depth exploration of central India’s premier national parks. There are 11 included safari outings to search for the unique wildlife imaginatively captured by authors such as Jim Corbett and Rudyard Kipling and you'll also have the chance to opt to do up to two more! Each park has differing ecosystems and topography and it is this variety that enables species such as monkey, leopard, deer, elephant, antelope, bear, squirrel, crocodile and countless species of birds to thrive. Of course, it is the mighty Bengal tiger that symbolises India’s wildlife heritage. Whilst it is impossible to guarantee a sighting, given the time devoted to wildlife viewing in parks famous for their tiger populations, the chances are high.

CITIES TO VISIT

PRICING

FIRST CLASS

Double Occupancy

USD 2249

Single Occupancy

USD 2699

DELUXE

Double Occupancy

USD 2811

Single Occupancy

USD 3374

OPPULENT

Double Occupancy

USD 3514

Single Occupancy

USD 4217

ITINERARY

Day
1
Fly to Delhi

Depart on overnight flight to Delhi from USA departure point.

Day
2
Arrive Delhi

You transfer to your first night’s accommodation and check in. In the afternoon you will have the option to take a tuk tuk (additional charge) to a nearby restaurant and market street. After lunch you can then explore the market and try your hand at haggling. 

Day
3
Ranthambore National Park

Setting off this morning you take the train south to the town of Sawai Madhopur, close to Ranthambore National Park (5hrs). Travelling through the state of Rajasthan you quickly become aware that this is one of India’s most colourful regions: most notable are the elegant women carrying terracotta pots of water from the village well, dressed in saris in a myriad of colours, their bangles tinkling as they walk. They and their families are the proud descendants of the heroic Rajputs who once ruled the state. When you arrive at Ranthambore there may be time for an optional afternoon game drive (additional charge). 

Day
4
Ranthambore National Park

Ranthambore National Park, covering 411 square kilometres of beautiful bush, is one of the premier national parks of India. A wonderful blend of historical ruins and wildlife, you will make two game drives during your stay here, with hopes of getting a sighting of the majestic Bengal tigers that survive among the ruined forts and temples.But it's not just the tigers to look out for, there are plenty of deer herds, both spotted and sambar that are often close to the tracks. Where the deer are, often the characterful langur monkeys are also close by. This is the only park of the three where you will be able to see crocodiles, and snakes sometimes make an appearance as well, so there’s plenty to watch out for! After the morning game drive you will have the option of going up to visit the Fort that overlooks the park. From the top you will be able to look out across the lake - take your binoculars with you and you might be able to spot crocodiles basking around the edge! There are lots of little nooks and crannies in the old buildings to explore and you can learn about the history of the people who built it.

Day
5
Visit Fatehpur Sikri - Agra

Take the morning train to Bharatpur. Here you may have the option of visiting the bird park (additional charge) if the rains have been good during the year. You'll head out on rickshaws to spot owls, storks and herons amongst others, before continuing by road to Fatehpur Sikri. Along this road are the remains of the kos minars. These wayside markers, which survive only as crumbled towers, point the way to the great city of Fatehpur Sikri. The city is built of rich red sandstone and was temporarily Akbar the Great’s capital. Akbar built this ‘City of Victory’ as a tribute to a sage who correctly foretold the birth of his three sons. Just 15 short years after building the new capital and removing his court, Akbar was forced to abandon it because the water supply deteriorated. Today its rose-coloured walls provide the visitor with an unforgettable impression of the majesty of a 16th century royal court. You continue to the city of Agra, which straddles the holy Yamuna River and remains one of South Asia’s greatest Moghul cities. 

Day
6
Agra & The Taj Mahal

Alternating with Delhi as the capital of the Moghul Empire, Agra’s past is inextricably linked with the most famous of India’s rulers, Shah Jahan, and is renowned for the most stunning mausoleum in the world - the Taj Mahal. No matter how many times you’ve seen it, watching the reflections of light gradually wash over the Taj continues to have a fresh impact. If the weather is good you will visit the Taj Mahal in time for the sunrise, and watch the masterpiece which shelters the tombs of Shah Jahan and Mumtaz Mahal take on a warm glow. Many people believe it to be the most perfectly proportioned building ever created. At first glance in daylight, it appears to be simply white marble, but closer inspection reveals that the surface is inlaid with a profusion of semi-precious stones, which form stylised flowers and bowers. Words fail to do it justice; only a visit can show you its exquisite beauty. After exploring the Taj Mahal you head over to the other side of the river to wander through the pavilions, gardens and passages of Agra Fort, a wonderful reminder of the skill of the artisans of the Moghul Empire.

Day
7
Khajuraho’s Erotic Temples

Moving on, you take to the train again and head deeper into central India. Travelling on an Indian train is an experience in itself. Almost everything you need is carried on the trains; hawkers will ply their trades selling chai (tea), snacks, books and many other things; and local people will be happy to ask you many questions about your lifestyle. On reaching Jhansi you drive for around four hours through India's ‘Middle Land’, the literal meaning of ‘Madhya Pradesh’, the state you now pass through. Almost a third of India's forests are located here amongst the hills - consisting of teak, sal, hardwickia, Indian ebony and rosewood. You can expect to arrive in Khajuraho by mid afternoon/early evening (depending upon train schedules). It was in these forests that Khajuraho’s erotic temples were rediscovered in the 19th century - forests which no doubt saved them from destruction, hidden as they were for hundreds of years. To the Victorians of the 1830s, the erotic sculptures, which feature amongst the other carvings of daily life decorating these beautiful temples, were both shocking and fascinating. The external walls of the 22 temples, which have survived the ravages of time, are covered with an unrivalled number of exquisite carvings. The 10th century Chandela artisans were masters of their craft, creating cool interiors to provide a welcome retreat from the hot tropical sun. This evening you’ll take a tour of the magnificent “western” group of temples. The incredible skill of the artisans cannot be emphasised enough, with friezes as little as 10 cm wide, crammed with the most amazing naturalistic detail, such as ornaments, hairstyles, jewellery and clothing. 

Day
8
Khajuraho To Bandhavgarh

This morning you leave Khajuraho and make the road journey south to Umaria, close to Bandhavgarh National Park. This is a long drive (five to six hours) but there’s much to see along the way, including farmland under cultivation and many sal and teak forests. As you leave the high plateaux the countryside gradually changes once again. On your approach to the buffer zone to the national park you may see some of its inhabitants - chital, nilgai and jackal. Upon arrival at the lodge you will have the opportunity to go on an optional afternoon game drive (additional charge).

Day
9
Bandhavgarh National Park

Bandhavgarh became the hunting ground for the Rewa kings and, in 1968, the present maharaja donated the area to the state as parkland. The core zone of the park is home to a wide variety of animal and birdlife. The flat grassy maidans provide good feeding ground for the chital who co-exist quite happily with fellow ruminants such as the nilgai and sambar. The langur monkey is often found nearby. Amongst the other animals that can be seen are muntjac, chinkara, barking deer, wild pigs, and porcupine. Wild dogs have recently increased in population, and hyena, foxes and jackals appear occasionally in the open countryside. It is primarily the tiger that you are hoping to find, and with its high population density, Bandhavgarh has a remarkable success rate for sightings. Along with this most regal of cats, leopard, jungle and wild cat are occasionally sighted. You have plenty of time to search out and photograph these animals during your stay as you have two full days to spend in and around the park. Rising very early in the morning you set out by 4WD on the first of four game drives. Hoping to spot the larger cats, you’ll track their pugmarks and listen carefully for any alarm calls. Even if you are unlucky this time, after ‘resting like the animals’ during the heat of the day, you take to the vehicles and go tracking again. Both inside and outside the park, there is an abundance of birdlife. The fruit and flowering trees attract a large variety such as the green pigeon, crested serpent eagle, hornbills, drongoes, fly- catchers, barbets, bee-eaters and parakeets, to name but a few. During your stay there may be an opportunity to take a ride by elephant (optional, additional charge) to view game. Within the park there are also some interesting cave shrines with Brahmin inscriptions from the 1st century BC. A hilltop fort dominates the park and is said to date back to the time of the Ramayana. The small village of Tala just outside the park has changed little for centuries. You can walk around or enjoy a cup of chai (tea) with the locals. You may also have the opportunity to visit the local school and meet the children. 

Day
10
Bandhavgarh National Park

Enjoy Bandavgarh National Park. All meals are included during you stay in Bandhavgarh National Park.

Day
11
Kanha National Park

Leaving Bandhavgarh you make the long drive of around five to six hours south to Kanha National Park. Lying in the Maikal hills and covering 1,945 sq. km over a variety of terrain, Kanha is vast. Once given over to hunting, since the mid-1950s the park has been a haven for wildlife. Best known as the inspiration behind Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book, Kanha is home to hundreds of different species (22 species of mammals and 230 species of birds) and with five game drives here, your chances of seeing many of them are excellent. On your viewing list are nilgai, jackal, porcupine, hyena, Indian gaur, swamp deer and the Indian pangolin. Birdlife include warblers, ibis, peafowl, drongo, flycatcher, rollers, kingfishers and the grey hornbill. There are deciduous forests, grassland and savannah, stands of bamboo and meandering rivers making Kanha one of India’s most beautiful parks.All meals are included during you stay in Kanha National Park.

Day
12
Kanha National Park

Today enjoy the nature and Kanha National Park. All meals are included during you stay in Kanha National Park.

Day
13
Kanha National Park

On your viewing list today are nilgai, jackal, porcupine, hyena, Indian gaur, swamp deer and the Indian pangolin. Birdlife include warblers, ibis, peafowl, drongo, flycatcher, rollers, kingfishers and the grey hornbill. There are deciduous forests, grassland and savannah, stands of bamboo and meandering rivers making Kanha one of India’s most beautiful parks.All meals are included during you stay in Kanha National Park.

Day
14
Kanha; Train To Delhi

You set out early this morning on your last game drive. You then drive to Jabalpur, five or so hours away, from where you catch the overnight train back to Delhi. Berth on overnight train 

Day
15
Delhi

The present metropolis of Delhi is at least the eighth city to have been founded on this site; its predecessors have been largely razed to the ground. When you arrive at the station a coach will take you to your hotel and you will have time to freshen up and catch up on some sleep before heading out on a half-day tour of Old and New Delhi. Old Delhi is bustling and vibrant - a network of narrow streets and alleys teeming with people. Mosques and temples are squeezed into spaces between shops and market stalls. You’ll visit the Jami Masjid, Delhi’s largest mosque, which is not only a centre of religious worship, but also a lively meeting place for the city’s Muslims. A fascinating contrast awaits as you head into New Delhi. Its wide boulevards and imposing buildings conjure up images of the British Empire at its zenith. After a busy day you’ll meet up in the evening for a ‘last supper’ together. You can recount your journey and swap stories about a great trip. 

Day
16
Depart Delhi

The trip ends for Land Only clients. For those with onward flights, transfer to Delhi Airport and fly home. 

Itinerary

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Day
1
Fly to Delhi

Depart on overnight flight to Delhi from USA departure point.

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Day
2
Arrive Delhi

You transfer to your first night’s accommodation and check in. In the afternoon you will have the option to take a tuk tuk (additional charge) to a nearby restaurant and market street. After lunch you can then explore the market and try your hand at haggling. 

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Day
3
Ranthambore National Park

Setting off this morning you take the train south to the town of Sawai Madhopur, close to Ranthambore National Park (5hrs). Travelling through the state of Rajasthan you quickly become aware that this is one of India’s most colourful regions: most notable are the elegant women carrying terracotta pots of water from the village well, dressed in saris in a myriad of colours, their bangles tinkling as they walk. They and their families are the proud descendants of the heroic Rajputs who once ruled the state. When you arrive at Ranthambore there may be time for an optional afternoon game drive (additional charge). 

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Day
4
Ranthambore National Park

Ranthambore National Park, covering 411 square kilometres of beautiful bush, is one of the premier national parks of India. A wonderful blend of historical ruins and wildlife, you will make two game drives during your stay here, with hopes of getting a sighting of the majestic Bengal tigers that survive among the ruined forts and temples.But it's not just the tigers to look out for, there are plenty of deer herds, both spotted and sambar that are often close to the tracks. Where the deer are, often the characterful langur monkeys are also close by. This is the only park of the three where you will be able to see crocodiles, and snakes sometimes make an appearance as well, so there’s plenty to watch out for! After the morning game drive you will have the option of going up to visit the Fort that overlooks the park. From the top you will be able to look out across the lake - take your binoculars with you and you might be able to spot crocodiles basking around the edge! There are lots of little nooks and crannies in the old buildings to explore and you can learn about the history of the people who built it.

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Day
5
Visit Fatehpur Sikri - Agra

Take the morning train to Bharatpur. Here you may have the option of visiting the bird park (additional charge) if the rains have been good during the year. You'll head out on rickshaws to spot owls, storks and herons amongst others, before continuing by road to Fatehpur Sikri. Along this road are the remains of the kos minars. These wayside markers, which survive only as crumbled towers, point the way to the great city of Fatehpur Sikri. The city is built of rich red sandstone and was temporarily Akbar the Great’s capital. Akbar built this ‘City of Victory’ as a tribute to a sage who correctly foretold the birth of his three sons. Just 15 short years after building the new capital and removing his court, Akbar was forced to abandon it because the water supply deteriorated. Today its rose-coloured walls provide the visitor with an unforgettable impression of the majesty of a 16th century royal court. You continue to the city of Agra, which straddles the holy Yamuna River and remains one of South Asia’s greatest Moghul cities. 

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Day
6
Agra & The Taj Mahal

Alternating with Delhi as the capital of the Moghul Empire, Agra’s past is inextricably linked with the most famous of India’s rulers, Shah Jahan, and is renowned for the most stunning mausoleum in the world - the Taj Mahal. No matter how many times you’ve seen it, watching the reflections of light gradually wash over the Taj continues to have a fresh impact. If the weather is good you will visit the Taj Mahal in time for the sunrise, and watch the masterpiece which shelters the tombs of Shah Jahan and Mumtaz Mahal take on a warm glow. Many people believe it to be the most perfectly proportioned building ever created. At first glance in daylight, it appears to be simply white marble, but closer inspection reveals that the surface is inlaid with a profusion of semi-precious stones, which form stylised flowers and bowers. Words fail to do it justice; only a visit can show you its exquisite beauty. After exploring the Taj Mahal you head over to the other side of the river to wander through the pavilions, gardens and passages of Agra Fort, a wonderful reminder of the skill of the artisans of the Moghul Empire.

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Day
7
Khajuraho’s Erotic Temples

Moving on, you take to the train again and head deeper into central India. Travelling on an Indian train is an experience in itself. Almost everything you need is carried on the trains; hawkers will ply their trades selling chai (tea), snacks, books and many other things; and local people will be happy to ask you many questions about your lifestyle. On reaching Jhansi you drive for around four hours through India's ‘Middle Land’, the literal meaning of ‘Madhya Pradesh’, the state you now pass through. Almost a third of India's forests are located here amongst the hills - consisting of teak, sal, hardwickia, Indian ebony and rosewood. You can expect to arrive in Khajuraho by mid afternoon/early evening (depending upon train schedules). It was in these forests that Khajuraho’s erotic temples were rediscovered in the 19th century - forests which no doubt saved them from destruction, hidden as they were for hundreds of years. To the Victorians of the 1830s, the erotic sculptures, which feature amongst the other carvings of daily life decorating these beautiful temples, were both shocking and fascinating. The external walls of the 22 temples, which have survived the ravages of time, are covered with an unrivalled number of exquisite carvings. The 10th century Chandela artisans were masters of their craft, creating cool interiors to provide a welcome retreat from the hot tropical sun. This evening you’ll take a tour of the magnificent “western” group of temples. The incredible skill of the artisans cannot be emphasised enough, with friezes as little as 10 cm wide, crammed with the most amazing naturalistic detail, such as ornaments, hairstyles, jewellery and clothing. 

kj,jk,jk,lkjk,kj,
Day
8
Khajuraho To Bandhavgarh

This morning you leave Khajuraho and make the road journey south to Umaria, close to Bandhavgarh National Park. This is a long drive (five to six hours) but there’s much to see along the way, including farmland under cultivation and many sal and teak forests. As you leave the high plateaux the countryside gradually changes once again. On your approach to the buffer zone to the national park you may see some of its inhabitants - chital, nilgai and jackal. Upon arrival at the lodge you will have the opportunity to go on an optional afternoon game drive (additional charge).

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Day
9
Bandhavgarh National Park

Bandhavgarh became the hunting ground for the Rewa kings and, in 1968, the present maharaja donated the area to the state as parkland. The core zone of the park is home to a wide variety of animal and birdlife. The flat grassy maidans provide good feeding ground for the chital who co-exist quite happily with fellow ruminants such as the nilgai and sambar. The langur monkey is often found nearby. Amongst the other animals that can be seen are muntjac, chinkara, barking deer, wild pigs, and porcupine. Wild dogs have recently increased in population, and hyena, foxes and jackals appear occasionally in the open countryside. It is primarily the tiger that you are hoping to find, and with its high population density, Bandhavgarh has a remarkable success rate for sightings. Along with this most regal of cats, leopard, jungle and wild cat are occasionally sighted. You have plenty of time to search out and photograph these animals during your stay as you have two full days to spend in and around the park. Rising very early in the morning you set out by 4WD on the first of four game drives. Hoping to spot the larger cats, you’ll track their pugmarks and listen carefully for any alarm calls. Even if you are unlucky this time, after ‘resting like the animals’ during the heat of the day, you take to the vehicles and go tracking again. Both inside and outside the park, there is an abundance of birdlife. The fruit and flowering trees attract a large variety such as the green pigeon, crested serpent eagle, hornbills, drongoes, fly- catchers, barbets, bee-eaters and parakeets, to name but a few. During your stay there may be an opportunity to take a ride by elephant (optional, additional charge) to view game. Within the park there are also some interesting cave shrines with Brahmin inscriptions from the 1st century BC. A hilltop fort dominates the park and is said to date back to the time of the Ramayana. The small village of Tala just outside the park has changed little for centuries. You can walk around or enjoy a cup of chai (tea) with the locals. You may also have the opportunity to visit the local school and meet the children. 

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Day
10
Bandhavgarh National Park

Enjoy Bandavgarh National Park. All meals are included during you stay in Bandhavgarh National Park.

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Day
11
Kanha National Park

Leaving Bandhavgarh you make the long drive of around five to six hours south to Kanha National Park. Lying in the Maikal hills and covering 1,945 sq. km over a variety of terrain, Kanha is vast. Once given over to hunting, since the mid-1950s the park has been a haven for wildlife. Best known as the inspiration behind Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book, Kanha is home to hundreds of different species (22 species of mammals and 230 species of birds) and with five game drives here, your chances of seeing many of them are excellent. On your viewing list are nilgai, jackal, porcupine, hyena, Indian gaur, swamp deer and the Indian pangolin. Birdlife include warblers, ibis, peafowl, drongo, flycatcher, rollers, kingfishers and the grey hornbill. There are deciduous forests, grassland and savannah, stands of bamboo and meandering rivers making Kanha one of India’s most beautiful parks.All meals are included during you stay in Kanha National Park.

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Day
12
Kanha National Park

Today enjoy the nature and Kanha National Park. All meals are included during you stay in Kanha National Park.

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Day
13
Kanha National Park

On your viewing list today are nilgai, jackal, porcupine, hyena, Indian gaur, swamp deer and the Indian pangolin. Birdlife include warblers, ibis, peafowl, drongo, flycatcher, rollers, kingfishers and the grey hornbill. There are deciduous forests, grassland and savannah, stands of bamboo and meandering rivers making Kanha one of India’s most beautiful parks.All meals are included during you stay in Kanha National Park.

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Day
14
Kanha; Train To Delhi

You set out early this morning on your last game drive. You then drive to Jabalpur, five or so hours away, from where you catch the overnight train back to Delhi. Berth on overnight train 

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Day
15
Delhi

The present metropolis of Delhi is at least the eighth city to have been founded on this site; its predecessors have been largely razed to the ground. When you arrive at the station a coach will take you to your hotel and you will have time to freshen up and catch up on some sleep before heading out on a half-day tour of Old and New Delhi. Old Delhi is bustling and vibrant - a network of narrow streets and alleys teeming with people. Mosques and temples are squeezed into spaces between shops and market stalls. You’ll visit the Jami Masjid, Delhi’s largest mosque, which is not only a centre of religious worship, but also a lively meeting place for the city’s Muslims. A fascinating contrast awaits as you head into New Delhi. Its wide boulevards and imposing buildings conjure up images of the British Empire at its zenith. After a busy day you’ll meet up in the evening for a ‘last supper’ together. You can recount your journey and swap stories about a great trip. 

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Day
16
Depart Delhi

The trip ends for Land Only clients. For those with onward flights, transfer to Delhi Airport and fly home. 

Inclusions

Accommodation for 15 nights
Meals: Breakfast in all destinations & all meals in Ranthambore, Bandhavgarh and Kanha
Internal flights within India on economy class
All airport and hotel transfers
All internal train journeys (Agra-Jhansi) on highest class available; private air-conditioned car with chauffeur in Delhi, Jaipur, Agra, Khajuraho, Bandhavgarh, Ranthambore, Kanha.
English-speaking local tour guides in Delhi, Agra, Khajuraho.
Sightseeing and activities including all entrance fees when accompanied by local guide; Jungle safaris included in Ranthambore, Bandhavgarh and Kanha
24 hour point of contact.

Exclusions

Prices are in USD and exclude international flights
The price quoted above is an approximate price per person in the high season (Oct to Mar). Prices may be higher during the Christmas – New Year period and lower in the low season (Apr – Sep). Travel Insurance is not included in the cost.

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